Let the wild rumpus live on . . .

Let the wild rumpus live on . . .

I remember taking Kid One for his first weekend in San Francisco, a dozen years ago. LL had to spend a few days at Macworld, so he and I tagged along, leaving the baby with Grandma and Grandpa and setting out for some serious big kid adventures. We took a ferry ride to Sausalito in the fog and warmed up with big bowls of overpriced clam chowder next to the the bay, checked out our weight on Jupiter at the Exploratorium, and made it educational with a little California history at Fort Point. Nothing, though, compared to what we discovered at the Metreon: a bigger-than-life Where the Wild Things Are playground. We didn’t know about this, didn’t plan for it or seek it out. We just wandered into the Metreon – a very strangely conceived building with a movie theater, a small handful of retail stores, and lots and lots of empty space – while LL was working to find a snack. It was just across the street from our hotel. What a wonderful, odd, quirky find . . . this colorful, cool, and completely empty exhibit sprawled over the top floor. We spent the whole afternoon climbing around; in my chronicle of mom-memories, this day ranks pretty high. Thanks to Maurice Sendak today for all his wonderful words and images that have made reading to the boys so enjoyable. And be sure to watch his interview with Stephen Colbert to discover what a very funny, charming man he was in person:   The Colbert ReportGet More: Colbert Report Full Episodes,Political Humor & Satire Blog,Video Archive Let the wild rumpus...

How do you manage kids and junk food?

I read this great article on Zite this morning: My Kid Likes Junk Food And That’s Ok by registered dietician, writer, and mom Sally Kuzemchak. She makes the point that, no matter how much a parent wants and tries to keep their child away from junk food, it enters their lives in some way. Yes. A child would have to be kept away from television, from movie previews, out of mainstream grocery stores, birthday parties, would have to ignore snacks other parents take to the park, and would probably have to stop engaging with other kids altogether, especially at lunch time, to remain blissfully unaware of junk food. When Kid One started school, I was truly shocked when I saw what some of the kids brought for lunch. Bologna sandwiches, Lunchables, potato chips and cookies in all sorts of packaged-for-lunch-box shapes and sizes . . . nary a piece of fresh fruit in sight. Trash cans filled with barely-eaten sandwiches and empty foil wrappers. This was Santa Cruz, after all; I honestly went into his kindergarten thinking the kids who brought that stuff would be ridiculed. And it wasn’t just lunchtime – in any class, over half brought in treats to celebrate their birthdays. Not homemade goodies, either, like these oatmeal cookies with Craisins my dad Downtown Tom just whipped up and emailed to me: Instead parents usually brought cupcakes from the Safeway bakery down the street: spongy yellow cakes piled with snow-white super-sweet frosting and season-appropriate sprinkles. Then there were the class parties: the random ice cream parties, pancake parties, the celebrations for Halloween, Thanksgiving, winter break, Valentine’s Day,...