The Amazing Texas-Toast-Bacon-and-Egg-Sandwich

The Amazing Texas-Toast-Bacon-and-Egg-Sandwich

Kid Two still loves Texas toast but along the way has acquired a taste for paninis with egg and baby greens with a bit of cheese. It was only a matter of time before he decided to try and combine the buttery crunchiness of Texas toast with savory eggy-ness of his panini. Like all good things, it’s a bit of work, but totally worth it. You have to start by making Texas toast. When that’s finished, layer thin slices of cheese and a handful of baby greens on one side. Top with crumbled, cooked bacon and a cooked scrambled egg. Top with the second piece of toast and there you go – a tasty handful of the ultimate bacon and egg meal: It’s pretty good on a paper plate with strawberries, too:...
Doctor up your pancake mix

Doctor up your pancake mix

Trader Joe’s Buttermilk Pancake Mix is my breakfast shortcut of choice. Just add eggs and water – or eggs, water, and oil for waffles – and presto! Pretty good homemade-tasting pancakes in a few minutes. It’s hard to find a from-scratch recipe that has that same rustic taste, and at just under two dollars per box it’s not a bad deal. I say pretty good, because I’ve figured out a way to doctor up the mix to make them great . . . more dense and toothy, moist and flavorful, even more healthy-feeling. Just follow the waffle recipe on the box: 3 1/2 cups mix, 2 eggs, 1 cup water, 1/2 cup oil. Only swap out 1/2 cup of whole wheat flour for 1/2 cup of the mix mix, substitute 1/2 cup applesauce for the 1/2 cup oil, and stir in 1 cup of oatmeal and 1 tsp cinnamon. Cook them slowly on medium-low heat. Mmmm. What is your favorite doctored-up baking...
Herb and nasturtium biscuits à la Julia Child

Herb and nasturtium biscuits à la Julia Child

Cooking with flowers – this is one of my 2013 New Year’s resolutions, so I couldn’t resist sneaking nasturtium petals into Julia Child’s herb biscuits this morning. Her classic recipe produces light, flaky biscuits, and the addition lemon pepper and spicy nasturtium petals add extra zing. Lovely at brunch with scrambled egg or at dinner with curried celery root soup. Click through for the recipe.

Bannocks – gluten free, vegetarian oat cakes

Bannocks – gluten free, vegetarian oat cakes

It’s been an oatmeal kind of autumn around here – there’s something about the cooler weather that calls out for the warmth and earthiness of hot oats, don’t you think? Recently I was having a taste flashback to the bannocks we used to eat when I was a kid living in Sitka, and decided to try and make them for the boys – but there were so many recipes out there . . . I didn’t know where to start. I wanted simple and oat-y; I wasn’t interested in adding flour to make them bread-like. I also wanted to capture all the flavors of a bowl of oatmeal in a simple round patty. So I did what I always do – read a handful of recipes and then make up my own. After a few weeks of tweeking, here I present (drum roll, please!) the perfect oatcake! Oats, egg, and banana are really the only ingredients you need; everything else just dresses the oatcakes up a bit. And if you use leftover cooked oatmeal, you can omit the egg and make it vegan. Seriously, don’t these look scrumptious? And did you ever think you’d see the words “scrumptious” and “oatmeal” together???   The boys LOVE these oatcakes – seriously love them, like a kid might love a chocolate chip cookie. Ok, they are way too old for me to worry about making kid-friendly food, but these totally pass the test. Kid One has even memorized the recipe so he’ll be able to recreate them when the day comes he has a kitchen of his own.   I love them...

Learn to scramble eggs with California Kid Kitchen

Some families watch baseball, others lean toward Survivor or X Factor . . . we watch cooking competitions. Next Food Network Star, Top Chef, and Iron Chef all reign supreme around our house, and sometimes while we’re walking pup we challenge each other to come up with dishes for outrageous, imaginary Chopped baskets. So it was probably just a logical step for LL to challenge Kid Two to come up with a cooking video of his own. He does cook a bit, and not just by toasting his own frozen waffles. He’s a master of scrambled eggs and Julia Child’s chocolate mousse, he makes pizza dough, minces veggies, and rolls out ravioli. But It took the free time of summer vacation before Kid Two could take his dad up on the challenge, and today presented him with a belated Father’s Day gift – the first installment in California Kid Kitchen: Scrambled Eggs. I just love this so much, on many different levels. In the most basic way, he really does teach kids how to scramble eggs, assuming no knowledge but without talking down to anyone. And it very much captures his laid-back personality, tossing out information when interesting and/or necessary, but not filling empty space with words. No worries that the stove was dirty, or that he used a knife to do the scrambling. Plus, he composed the background music himself! So without further ado, here it is . . . California Kid Kitchen Episode One: Scrambled Eggs. Made with love from Kid Two to LL for Father’s Day 2012. embedded by Embedded...

What makes a good hash (latimes.com)

Many weekend mornings lately have started this way: mince a handful of onion, dice a couple ribs of celery, saute in a little grapeseed oil, add some leftovers and a couple of cubed potatoes, and pretty soon we’ve got hash. It’s gone Mexican, topped with poached eggs and smoked poblano and red onion-laced Hollandaise sauce. It’s gone Italian, flavored with our own version of muffaletta (ham, salami, black olives, pimiento-stuffed green olives, celery, yellow onion, green onion, provolone cheese) that was the previous night’s pizza topping. Making hash makes me feel like I’ve made good use of leftovers in a creative, hearty, and thrifty way. So this story from the LA Times caught my eye this morning: What makes a good hash. Sarah Karnasiewic, the author, does a nice job outlining hash’s basic theme and variations. If you’ve never made hash before, you should read this article to get inspired – especially if, as in my case, you’re cooking for a family and find it’s easy to get stuck in the “what in the world am I going to feed them NOW!” rut. I was interested and please to see that my hash-making instincts match a professional’s. Most valuable to me are her suggestions on incorporating different types of root vegetables – and even...