Curried celery root soup

Curried celery root soup

A fabulous warming winter root vegetable soup recipe with celeriac and curry – my delicious and divine interpretation of a Nepenthe soup. Easily adaptable to a vegetarian diet and completely gluten-free. Enjoy! Click through for recipe and photos.

Michael Voltaggio makes Sheldon’s sour tamarind soup

The best part of the Top Chef Season 10’s heart-wrenching Restaurant Wars was Sheldon Simeon. He dug into his Filipino roots for Restaurant Herbano, named after his grandfather, and concocted a sour tamarind soup with pork belly, shrimp, and fish to win the elimination challenge. I didn’t really know anything about tamarinds. It’s a date-like fruit native to tropical Africa but grown all over the world. Wikipedia tell me that it’s used in everything from candy and soda to soup and curry as well as in traditional medicine, the wood is used in in furniture-making, and lemurs eat the leaves. Quite a versatile fruit. Here’s a nice photo of a ripe tamarind cut open to reveal the pasty fruit from caribbeanpot.com Here is Season 6 winner Michael Voltaggio demonstrating how to make that winning soup in this Top Recipe video: Content and/or other value provided by our partner,...

Artichoke soup recipes

I saw a short tweet just now about a creamy crock pot artichoke soup, and when I clicked through found this wonderful, short booklet put together by Ocean Mist Farms, a local grower. Click through for the link –>

Meatless Monday: Potato leek soup with a twist

Meatless Monday: Potato leek soup with a twist

Fennel and artichoke hearts add an earthy twist to Julia Child’s excellent potato leek soup – a quick entree I learned to make forever ago from her Mastering the Art of French Cooking. In addition to 2 large chopped leeks – white part only –  and 2 pounds peeled and chopped russet potatoes, just add 1 large chopped fennel bulb and 1 can water-packed artichoke hearts to your pot. I discard the feathery fennel tops and thinly slice the bulbs. Use these often in your soups – they hold up nicely in a stew, puree well, and add a hind of licorice along with a boost of fiber and potassium to your meals. The rest of a proverbial piece of cake. Just barely cover with water, add a pinch of paprika and lots and lots of freshly ground lemon pepper. Simmer until it’s all tender, about 30 – 40 minutes. It will look like this: Use a hand blender to puree, and you end up with a nice thick warming entree. Add butter and salt at your pleasure and discretion. Serve in warm bowls with a fresh baguette and warm radishes. Go crazy and top with a bit of sour cream and crispy prosciutto if you like....

Leftover rotisserie chicken stock

You probably pick up a rotisserie chicken from the grocery store every now and then if you don’t roast your own. I do, probably once every two weeks or so, and make stock from the leftover carcass. It’s an easy way to always have homemade chicken stock on hand – plus, I like the idea of using the entire animal for nourishment. This is my recipe. It is infinitely variable, so please don’t worry about proper herbs or exact measurements. Just don’t add salt. This is an ingredient, not a finished soup, and you can adjust the seasoning later on. If you refrigerate this instead of freezing, you may notice it looks like Jell-o. If so, congratulations! You’ve made a perfect, luscious, extra-rich, nutrient-filled chicken stock. Leftover rotisserie chicken stock   Save Print Cook time 1 hour Total time 1 hour   Simple way to make chicken stock from leftovers Author: Life in a Skillet Recipe type: soup Ingredients 1 leftover rotisserie chicken or roasted chicken carcass 2 carrots, quartered lengthwise 2 ribs celery, quartered lengthwise 1 medium onion, quartered 1 tbsp black pepper 1 bay leaf 1 tsp fresh chopped Italian oregano 1 tsp fresh chopped thyme Instructions Place ingredients in a stockpot and add 2 quarts of water. Bring JUST to a boil. Immediately, reduce heat to simmer and cover. Simmer for 45 minutes. Strain. When cool, measure into 8- or 16-ounce canning jars and freeze. Notes Substitution notes: 1 tsp hot curry powder and a 1" chunk of ginger root for the thyme, oregano, and bay leaf makes a flavorful stock with an Asian flair. Other good...
Corn and Poblano Chowder Recipe

Corn and Poblano Chowder Recipe

“Rich, rich, rich, pale green with teeny tiny flecks of carrot and a perfect corn, cream, poblano balance” – that’s what I jotted down about el Papagayo’s crema de elote y poblano – cream of corn and poblano. Of all the wonderful food we ate in Loreto, this is the one I was most interested in recreating as a family meal. It was served topped with fresh diced tomato and had a few discernible corn kernels, but was mostly a lovely, velvety, pureed soup.   I thought it would be nice to recreate as a chowder, but my first try was much more hot mess than chowdery goodness. The first mistake: cutting my carrots and potatoes into stew-size chunks instead of soup-sized nibbles. The biggest mistake: simmering corn on the cob with seeded poblano peppers to make what I thought would be a tasty green pepper-infused corn stock. Fail. Big time. Since I didn’t char the poblano first, the broth was WAY too spicy, and not in a “good burn after the bite” sort of way, just in a “I just bit into a poblano” bitter spice sort of way. Because of the strong raw pepper taste, the corn was lost along with any depth of flavor. Plus, it still wasn’t green. Sadly, though, I’d already added two cups of the mixture to a sautéed onion, celery, and carrot base, so I carried on, simmering the corn cobs in the soup to boost the corn flavor. Then the cobs started to disintegrate, leaving tiny corn kernel casings in the soup. Grrr. I gave up on trying to infuse any more corn taste...
Umami artichoke soup recipe

Umami artichoke soup recipe

Somewhere along the line I picked up an excellent cookbook called Soups of Italy: Cooking over 130 Soups the Italian Way by Norma Wasserman-Miller. Her short history of Italian soup in the first chapter is really interesting; she writes that zuppa, the Italian word for soup, derives from the Gothic word suppa, defined as “a slice of bread, soaking.” I did have to look this up: it was by the end of the third century that the Goths and Romans crossed paths via Gothic incursion. I imagine Gothic warriors gathered around a fire, soaking up the juices from some spit-roasted wild game with big hunks of rye bread – did they share with the Romans after battle? Did the Romans eye their meal hungrily? Did the Goths share? Either way, it’s an interesting example of cultural exchange during warfare. Soups of Italy is also more than just a collection of recipes; she teaches the language and techniques of soup-making, breaking the process down into its basic components. Battuto is the aromatic starter, such as garlic or onion. Sapori are the main ingredients, the vegetables or meat. Brodo is the liquid component, and condimenti – pasta and grated cheese – finish a soup. It’s possible to improvise an entire symphony of soups once you know the basic construction. Not just with Italian flavors; I’ve been able to create nice Chinese and Mexican inspired soups by transposing the basic components to a different geographic key. But I promised you artichokes. Wasserman-Miller’s recipe for Artichoke and Pasta soup, Minestra de Carciofi e Pasta, was the first one I tried. The tomato-artichoke flavor combination is irresistible ....